Voices For Life

Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. We cover issues from conception until natural death, as well as all family life issues.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Another Gushing Profile of Hillary Clinton: "One of Us, Only Better"


By Dave Andrusko
National Right to Life


Hey, this is fair, isn’t it? The Washington Post takes the equivalent of a buzzsaw to Donald Trump every 90 seconds and, with three weeks to go before the election, runs a gushing profile today of Hillary Clinton’s high school years so sugary just reading it will add extra inches around your waist.

The overall narrative is depressingly familiar. Clinton, once a conservative “Goldwater girl,” evolves to a liberal Democrat, spurred by a young associate pastor who comes to her small town Methodist church andexposes the kids to the “real world,” helping Clinton break out of the “typical homogeneous cocoon.”

How could anyone not love/admire/fall down in awe/vote for someone who , in the eighth grade, “learned to square dance, became a lifeguard, played plenty of table tennis” and who every night, along with “her younger brothers, Hughie and Tony, knelt by their beds to pray”?

In Zak’s profile, fellow students from Maine East High School fall over themselves praising her intelligence and her diligence and her commitment to service and…and…and.

She may have “lacked the charisma to win the contest for student council president,” a fellow student remembers, “but she had the intellect to win a battle of ideas” [in a debate setting, where she smoked her male opponent].

And, Zak writes, Clinton viewed her Christianity “as a mandate to respond to social needs, according to Rosalie Bentzinger, who was then the church’s director of Christian education. ‘It was apparent from her youth that was she was going to be a person who cared about other people,’ says Bentzinger, now 92 and living in Iowa, ‘and that she was an activist.’”

In case anyone thought Clinton was/is a snob, there’s this observation: “She’s one of us but she’s different,” with “a higher sense of service.” One of the people, only better.


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