Voices For Life

Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. We cover issues from conception until natural death, as well as all family life issues.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Ninth Circuit Gives Dave Daleiden a Win in University of Washington Baby Body Parts Investigation


By Michael Gryboski
Christian Post


A Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals panel gave pro-life activist Dave Daleiden a victory Monday after he was barred by a lower court from releasing information about the University of Washington's purchase of baby body parts for research.

Last November, a Seattle-based district court judge placed an injunction prohibiting Daleiden from releasing the names and job titles of university personnel involved in research using aborted babies' body parts that were harvested by Planned Parenthood.

Regarding the Ninth Circuit panel's decision on Monday, Thomas More Society's Special Counsel Peter Breen said in a statement to Fox News earlier this week that the ruling "has prevented a serious threat to the public's right to know how their tax dollars are being spent."

The three-judge panel concluded that while they "agree with the district court that there may be a basis for redaction where disclosure would likely result in threats, harassment, and violence," the district court failed to "address how the Doe Plaintiffs have made the necessary clear showing with specificity as to the different individuals or groups of individuals who could be identified in the public records.
"The district court also made no finding that specific individuals or groups of individuals were engaged in activity protected by the First Amendment and what that activity was," read the decision.
"We remand for the district court to address how disclosure of specific information would violate the constitutional or statutory rights of particular individuals or groups of individuals."
The panel did decided that the injunction of the lower court would remain in place for a period not to exceed 120 days so the district court can "enter the necessary findings of fact and conclusions of law supporting injunctive relief, consistent with this disposition."


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