Voices For Life

Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. We cover issues from conception until natural death, as well as all family life issues.

Friday, January 5, 2018

Pro-Abortion Student Defends Infanticide. Killing a 2-Year-Old Baby is Okay Because “It Can’t Communicate”



By Steven Ertelt
Life News


A pro-abortion student has been filmed on video defending infanticide, saying there is nothing wrong with killing a two-year-old baby. The student at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville bragged about his support for infanticide up to two years of age.

The video, provided to LifeNews by Students for Life of America, shows a pro-abortion student defending his position in favor of ending the lives of unborn children.

During the video, the student also defends infanticide and says that there’s nothing wrong with killing newborn babies because they are not capable of taking care of themselves or holding an intellectual conversation. The twisted logic claims that because babies are not on the same level as someone old enough to feed and clothe themselves and to carry on a conversation that apparently their life is somehow less valuable.

That is the same contorted and twisted logic that abortion advocates use to defend abortion. Supposedly because unborn babies are something less than capable adult human beings their lives have no value. It is the same kind of logic that also persecutes the elderly and disabled and says that their lives have less value because they are supposedly less capable.

“The fact of the matter is without communication, we have no way of knowing of you are sentient or not,” the unidentified student says in the video clip. “It’s no different than this tree. It’s alive, but is it sentient? I don’t know. I cannot communicate with it.”
Then he defends killing infants.
“Can the two year old talk to me? In some instances I’m fairly certain that is,” the student said. “But generally speaking the child still has the inability to communicate. And until we determine that as such at what point does sentience become an issue. We can’t really debate whether or not that is the situation or not.”

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