Voices For Life

Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. We cover issues from conception until natural death, as well as all family life issues.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Help an Abortion Worker Leave the Business!



from Lauren MuzykaExecutive Director
Sidewalk Advocates for Life



Just over a week ago, Norma McCorvey — previously known as "Jane Roe" in the landmark abortion case, Roe v. Wade — passed away at the age of 69. She was laid to rest just this past weekend in the Houston area, surrounded by family and friends.

Even though she was the woman seeking a legal abortion in the case, ironically, she never had an abortion; her child was placed in a loving home through the gift of adoption.

Following the ruling in Roe, she, unfortunately, ended up working in the abortion industry. But as my friend Shawn Carney of 40 Days for Life notes, it was while she was working at an abortion center that she experienced her conversion. Norma eventually rejected abortion and became a stanch pro-life advocate and follower of Christ. She later operated a small ministry called Roe No More.

It was the power of love, prayer, and peaceful outreach that won her over to the our side of the fence.

Interestingly, Planned Parenthood, NARAL, and the entire abortion industry seemed virtually silent as news of her passing made its way quickly into the mainstream media. Why? After all, wasn't this their poster child for abortion rights?

In truth, the conversion of Norma McCorvey is bad publicity for the abortion industry. And that goes for the multitude of others who once worked to promote and sell abortion, came to the light of truth, and now, work to save lives — amazing advocates like Abby Johnson, Catherine Adair, Ramona Treviño, Sue Thayer, Jewels Green, and many others.

The abortion industry thrives in darkness. Former workers are their Achilles Heel because they reveal what goes on behind closed doors each and every day.

I'm proud to work in a ministry that is not only there for abortion-bound women and men, but the workers, too. After all, while we are there to save lives, we are also there to plant seeds to save souls. I cannot think of any more worthy endeavor than rescuing someone from the culture of death and witnessing to the new, abundant life waiting for them in Jesus Christ.

On the sidewalk, we refer all the workers we encounter to Abby Johnson's abortion worker ministry, And Then There Were None (ATTWN), who are experts in helping workers leave the business without fear of exploitation. When a worker wants to leave, they provide free financial, spiritual, and legal help during their transition. (See more at abortionworker.com.) 

Since their inception, ATTWN has helped over 300 workers leave the business... and here's the amazing thing: Over 70% of the workers coming to them say that they received info on ATTWN from someone on the sidewalk!

Since Sidewalk Advocates for Life began 2.5 years ago, 40 workers have left with the help of a Sidewalk Advocate!

Here's a few tips we've gathered from Abby and her team that we utilize to help a worker out of the business...
1. Understand that while we know abortion is terribly wrong and no one should be working in the abortion business, so many workers have abortions in their past and are hurting; no doubt, many are trying to justify their past choice through their work. Understand that you are a sinner in a need of God's grace, too, and the best way to start is with love. 
2. Don't immediately challenge a worker on why they are working there. Instead, start with a simple opening like, "Hi, how are you! I'm (name) with the peaceful sidewalk ministry. I'll be out here praying for all the clients and workers inside! Anything I can pray for today?"
 3. Aim to build a relationship over time — don't overwhelm them with 20 questions all at once, but be friendly, kind, and invite a conversation from time to time. Periodically, mention abortionworker.com (you can either whisper the website or give abortion worker literature from ATTWN). 
4. Begin and end dialogue with a smile. Just like with an abortion-minded client, be a safe place for a worker, too.

As always, if we can be a resource for you as you seek to love abortion workers out of the industry, please let us know!

Even as I write this, Sidewalk Advocates are building relationships with abortion workers all over the globe in an effort to love them out of the business. Please join me in a prayer today that we can add many, many more abortion workers to that 40 — and see many beautiful, glorious conversion stories like Norma McCorvey for an end to abortion and God's glory!


      
Sidewalk Advocates for Life takes a peaceful, prayerful, law-abiding approach to reaching out to those servicing the abortion center. We seek to be the hands & feet of Christ and to ‘stand in the gap’ for those who, ironically, may feel they have no choice. While we provide crisis intervention on the sidewalk to women in unplanned pregnancies headed into the abortion center, we recognize that our outreach can only go so far: we must offer her real, ongoing help or crisis management. Our interaction never ends without offering her life-affirming alternatives such as help from the local pregnancy resource center(s) and other organizations in her local community.  For more information, please visit their website using this link. 


Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. To read our Mission Statement, use this link. Follow us on FacebookGoogle, and Pinterest. Help us spread the pro-life message by sharing our articles on your favorite social networks.

Pregnant, need help or know someone who does?  


National Hotline: Call 1-800-712-HELP or Text 'HELPLINE' to 313131.
In Southeast Penna:  Call or text 610-626-4006  

If you or someone you know is suffering after abortion, confidential non-judgmental help is available.  Call Project Rachel's national toll-free number 888-456-HOPE (4673) or visit hopeafterabortion.org.  



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