Voices For Life

Voices for Life is an e-publication dedicated to informing and educating the public on pro-life and pro-family issues. We cover issues from conception until natural death, as well as all family life issues.

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Pregnant Chinese Pro-Life Activist Facing Pressure to Abort Her Second Child Now Safe in the U.S.

china22


MICAIAH BILGER   DEC 3, 2015

Chinese pro-life activist Sarah Huang has helped more than 100 women save their babies from being aborted under China’s cruel one-child policy.

But this fall, Huang (not her real name) found herself in the same situation that she had helped so many other families out of – being pressured to abort her unborn child.

World Magazine reports that when Huang discovered she was pregnant with her second child, her friends and family tried to convince her to have an abortion. Huang told the magazine that her family also could face a fine of $35,000 and her husband could lose his job because of their second baby.

Over the phone, she expressed to [World News reporter June Cheng] her fear she would face the same fate as women she’s helped in the past—that she’d be ratted out, officials would drag her to a clinic, strap her to a metal table, and forcibly abort her baby. While forced abortions are officially illegal in China, they still occur in rural areas. But Huang knew the baby had been given to her by God.

Even the recent change from a one-child policy to a two-child policy wouldn’t help Huang’s situation. She got pregnant before the announced change and the implementation of the new law will take place gradually throughout the country. Her options dwindled to getting a divorce, raising a child without hukou—China’s household registration—or traveling to the United States to give birth.

While weighing their options, the Huangs applied for travel visas and hid in a safe house, where Huang continued trying to help other women even as she faced danger herself. One night she called [China Life Alliance founder Matthew] Li saying police officers with dogs were at her door, and she refused to let them in. At that point, Li knew they had to get her out of the country.

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